THE WATER TOWER BOOK

adminComment(0)

The Watertower book. Read 88 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Nobody in Preston could remember when the watertower was built, or w. Crew (First Light) weaves a disquieting tale set in an Australian outback town, where a rusted old watertower seems to be inhabited by a malevolent alien. The Watertower is a young adult's picture book written by Australian author Gary Crew and illustrated by Steven Woolman. The story, which takes place in.


The Water Tower Book

Author:BESSIE FLEHARTY
Language:English, Indonesian, German
Country:Papua New Guinea
Genre:Environment
Pages:219
Published (Last):15.11.2015
ISBN:447-1-18831-425-8
ePub File Size:15.63 MB
PDF File Size:20.21 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Registration Required]
Downloads:30531
Uploaded by: SANTA

The Watertower continues to attract interest - and readers. Crew, a prestidigitator of words, has managed to work his magic -The Horn Book Magazine. Watertower by Gary Crew, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. The Watertower is an Australian picture book written by popular children's author Gary Crew and illustrated by Steven Woolman. It was first Published in .

The Watertower

Books I Love Best Yearly: Read Australia Award. Retrieved from " https: Hidden categories: All stub articles. Namespaces Article Talk.

Views Read Edit View history. Languages Add links. This page was last edited on 30 January , at The Watertower by Gary Crew is a very eerie book about two young boys and a watertower. After their swim, Bubba is wrapped in a towel, looking for his clothes but they have been blown away. Since Spikes' clothes are still there, he offers to run to his friends house to get him a pair of shorts.

Bubba The Watertower by Gary Crew is a very eerie book about two young boys and a watertower.

Bubba is left in the watertower for a good 20 minutes, alone and afraid. Spike returns and Bubba expresses something that he would not normally say, Spike is concerned and worried.

The way Bubba's face changes from the beginning to the end is very creepy, almost scary. The last page where Bubba is staring into your eyes gives a very chilling feeling. The words and the pictures are equally as important, I feel that the pictures are very important to the story and wouldn't make sense without them.

I don't think I'll keep this book on my bookshelf because of how eerie it is. Apr 02, Liz Thompson rated it it was amazing Shelves: I loved this story! I was hooked from the very beginning. Gary Crew wrote a dark and mysterious picture book about two boys, Spike, and Bubba who make their way up to Preston's old mysterious water tower even though the two boys knew they had no business being up there.

Bubba ends up losing his pants and why he is waiting for Spike to return with a backup, mysterious things being to happen. I loved this story so much because the pictures told the majority of a story. To be honest I found th WOW! To be honest I found the picture of the townspeople staring, was very creepy.

Their eyes were very scary they looked to me to be possessed. Another Image I enjoyed was the one inside the water tower, you could see oldness and the rustiness of the tower that the words described and so on and so forth. I think this book is perfect for fourth to the fifth grader, the vocabulary is on their level and I think most would enjoy the mystery aspect of it. As I said, this was such an enjoyable read and it can be used inside the classroom in a number of the way but particularly when discussing setting and scene of a story.

Jan 01, Zoe Rawlings rated it it was amazing Shelves: Currently using this book as part of a Year 5 'suspense and mystery' unit, with a boy-heavy class with many behavioural challenges.

I can honestly say I have never seen these children respond to any lesson as enthusiastically as they did when I showed them this story. It is a fantastic book, with beautiful illustrations that my class and I pored over together for a good few lessons, noticing lots of small details and something new each time we looked at the book again.

The text itself does not gi Currently using this book as part of a Year 5 'suspense and mystery' unit, with a boy-heavy class with many behavioural challenges. The text itself does not give much detail which adds to the mystery.

Watertower

The water tower is extremely creepy, and it feels that the two unsuspecting characters are walking into a trap by going there.

The creepy residents of the town are never explained, but are seen with the strange symbol on their hands and clothes, looking towards the water tower as if in a trance.

We don't even know what happens to Bubba at the end of the story, and why he suddenly changes in the way in talks and behaves. The authors did a great job at manipulating the reader. Our eyes were drawn to certain aspects of the pictures and we decided what the importance of these things might be.

Shop now and earn 2 points per $1

When turning the pages, we had to turn the whole book around, as if we the readers were being manipulated by a strange something in the story. Overall, a great book. Apr 03, Jared Kling rated it it was amazing Shelves: The Watertower is about two boys that live in a small town that has a mysterious water tower that no one can remember when it was built or who built it. This book has beautifully done illustrations to go along with a very descriptive text.

This book may be considered a picture book but has great use of descriptive complex text. This creates a great book that is great for older readers that may want a change of pace from a typical novel. I think this book could be read for pleasure as well as rea The Watertower is about two boys that live in a small town that has a mysterious water tower that no one can remember when it was built or who built it. I think this book could be read for pleasure as well as read aloud to students.

May 25, Tiffany Lynn Kramer rated it really liked it.

Crew's The Watertower is subtle, yet unmistakably creepy. Nothing outright happens , nor does it need to. The suggestion is more than enough to leave the reader haunted by the end. While the illustrations aren't to my taste they work well for the story. Done in a style often found decorating Ma and Pop groceries and county diners they incapacitating small town life easily and add to the dread of the story.

Nicely done all around. Feb 26, Maddi rated it it was amazing. I read this book to my Year 5 class and they absolutely loved this! It definitely is an intense book! The more you assess the images, the more you notice! Jun 23, Beth rated it really liked it Shelves: This was another of those books my English tutor read to us at the end of seminars.

I'm still a bit traumatised. Nov 29, Sean Harding rated it really liked it. Another peculiar inventive and very well done illustrated book from Crew, who knows how to take the whole genre and make it his own.

Nov 27, Cheri rated it liked it. Unique illustrations. Oct 25, Maren rated it really liked it Shelves: This was What the heck! I loved the format of this book and thought it would be different, but it was creepy! A good book for late October, that's for sure. Mar 05, Josh rated it it was amazing.

Mar 05, Bellasmella22 rated it liked it. It was a interesting book needing a lot of thought at the end.

The author left a lot of suspense at the end. Mar 05, GVDH rated it really liked it.

Mar 05, Rev rated it really liked it. Jan 02, Ichiko rated it it was amazing Shelves: As my understanding, this story is quite mysterious. I thought that because I realised when me and my friends read this book, we each had a very different understanding of the imformation given from this book.

There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Readers also enjoyed. Readers are unsettled by the shifting orientation of image and text on each opening which is accompanied by circular coloured tiles and sepia thumbnails of the incessant watertower. Not all picture books are suitable for a young audience …. Some paragraphs and ideas need further refinement. We used these questions to frame out thoughts on selected openings.

Analysing Picture Books. Symbols and rituals are shared experiences that help foster a sense of belonging among members of a group. The initial opening unusually contains publishing details as well as situating the story in Preston, but more specifically Shooters Hill.

Colours are soft — wispy white clouds and faded orange grass — blurring reality and causing readers to engage emotionally with the menacing environment.

Belonging is shaped via relationships between people and places.

In the second opening, we are drawn to the face of the foregrounded male figure. Reflecting the tower, his glasses invite us to follow his gaze across the streetscape.

The central figure becomes important when we locate him at the end of the bench. Closely seated with uniformed workers, his slouched posture sets him apart and, significantly, he lacks the circular symbol which binds the community.

The highly saturated illustrations, using realistic colours of orange, contrasting with a cool blue, take us to a typical rural setting.

Customer Reviews

An absence of any sense of belonging can generate feelings of isolation and disaffection. The opening reveals Bubba climbing up the watertower ladder, to exit through the hatch. The ghastly green and dispersed black portrays the felling of eeriness for the viewer. We empathise with Bubba due to being in danger. The naturalistic scene of Bubba climbing allows us to feel as though we are present with him.

The reoccurring circular symbol is present within the ripples in the water that seem to stalk Bubba from below. Branching algae have the sinister armlike connotation as though they are trying to drag Bubba to them. The long-shot from below reinforces that Bubba is a small insignificant other within the tight-knit community. The light of the hatch has meanings of eventual acceptance, as long as he conquers each barrier he faces.Children's Book of the Year Award: The watertower symbol is repeated up to 5 times throughout the image; in the iris of two and again on the hats of two men.

The book is cleverly designed, forcing the reader to rotate it and simulating the round shape of the watertower itself. This book has beautifully done illustrations to go along with a very descriptive text.

Create New "Nobody in Preston could remember when the water tower was built, or who had built it, but there it stood on Shooter's Hill - its iron legs rusted, its egg-shaped tank warped and leaking - casting a long, dark shadow across the valley, across Preston itself. In Europe he has twice been and twice the prestigious White Raven Award for his illustrated books. Crew lets readers draw their own conclusions about these strange events.

I loved this story so much because the pictures told the majority of a story.

HETTIE from Santa Maria
Please check my other posts. I have only one hobby: list of types of games. I enjoy studying docunments potentially.
>