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Tomorrow, two of his men will come here to bring you forth to answer questions.

Men of property have accused you, saying your healing arts are miracles of the Devil. The Auldearn minister will testify to this.

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Others will be compelled to speak against you. Jowanet wondered if she were to die then, to be strangled and burnt as was the Fate of those condemned for witchcraft. It need not be so, Willeam said. This very night you can take your leave, and keep to the path I show you, and you will be spared the road to gallows hill.

But to go where? This was the only home Jowanet had known for fifty years. Her children and family were here. Here she was known; here she knew the people, the land itself. Willeam urged her to leave with him; there were others, he assured her, who could still find relief from her arts. His words struck as hard as steel; Jowanet would not see her grandchildren born. She would not see them grow through the years. But, Willeam said, thy children will live long lives, and have children of their own, who will in their own turn have children.

Jowanet told Willeam that her only wish was to die in Whitemire, the place where she was born. Willeam vowed to her that it would be so. She left the bag of gold coin given her by the Dunbars where her son would find it, wrapped a heavy plaid of wool around herself, and departed on horseback in the darkness. Jowanet traveled south for days, through narrow paths in the Darnaway Forest that she never knew existed.

Willeam went before her, sometimes as a man, and at other times in the shape of a crow. She crossed the Findhorn River and came at length to the village of Ferness. From there, she was guided south again into the desolate lands of the Dava Moors, overlooked by the ancient Red Hills. These were the wide and brooding lands that lived under the sword of the Wolf of Badenoch, who had ruled from his great castle at Lochindorb many centuries before.

Jowanet lost track of the time she spent wandering, alone. Hunger began to shrink her limbs. Early one morning, as her horse trotted through the mist alongside the Ourack Burn, she came to the place where those waters met the River Divie. There was a wide copse of dark trees nearby, and a large farmhouse with many pins for sheep and goats. For such a remote farm, it was pleasantly arranged and seemed prosperous.

This was the farmstead of Mathew Caugiltoun, who revealed to Jowanet upon her arrival that his only son- a boy of four- was stricken with fever and blisters, and near to his final hour. Jowanet told him she could help, and was taken to the boy's side.

Great joy descended on the house after that time as Mathew's son fast recovered, and yet the servants muttered to themselves that a darkness came with the strange woman- it was a crow that led her here, they whispered among themselves. Mathew Caugiltoun would tolerate none of their gossip; he was a man of gratitude, and he took Jowanet into his household from that day onward.

And there Jowanet remained, treated as a member of Mathew's family, for twenty years. She never told of her origins or life in the lands to the north; Mathew's family knew her as Agnes, and his children came to think of her as a grandmother. It carried Jowanet Innes, now seventy years of age, back to her home.

Many of those she knew from before were dead or departed, but whispers soon began. A few of the folk who recognized her still lifted their hats, or stared in silent awe. The Earl of Moray had died some years before; former things and troubles had passed away. Her husband had also died many seasons before her return, but her son James had leased land and built a large farmhouse, and had many more sheep.

He welcomed his mother with a fierce joy, and she embraced her grandsons, themselves now grown to manhood. A little over a year later, on a bright April morning, Jowanet did not wake from her sleep.

Her family gathered around her in great sadness, grateful at least that she had returned to them for the short time she did. But Jowanet didn't see their tears as they circled her bed; she rose and went to the door of the farmhouse, and then outside where she beheld the sun burning white in the sky. The mud of the roads was gone and the sheep were quiet; the sky and the earth unfurled around her in their timeless power.

She walked down the road until the path began to curve; she crossed the grasses and passed below the budding trees, and then through the cool water of the Denny.

Then she entered the wide green meadow that waited on the other side. There waiting for her was the sandy-haired man, draped in a long white tunic. They embraced and lay on the warm hillsides, talking and laughing for a long while, as butterflies drifted through the clear air.

The darkness and the light passed over them. Jowanet's companion finally took her hand and led her to the far end of the meadow, and into the shining forest that spread out endlessly beyond it. Its goal is to bring the reality of historical sorcery back to life in the modern world.

Sorcery, Witchcraft, and Magic Covenant DeSavyok is a society of men and women who practice sorcery according to pre- modern methods, and within a field of pre-modern aesthetics, in the modern day. The Covenant's methods and aesthetics both rise from historical documents and folklore, and from a unique worldview that is informed by that history and folklore, as well as by the science of systems theory, the philosophy of Phenomenology, and deep ecology.

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Sorcery refers to the art- an art which is as old as humankind, and which has appeared in various forms in every known historical human culture- of obtaining preternatural attention, guidance, and empowerment by making relationships with spirits, or other-than-human persons.

Spirits are living beings that exist in an extraordinary way compared to the ordinary encounters one may have with other beings on a day to day basis, such as cats, birds, other humans, or fir trees. Spirits are not aspects of the human psyche; they are objectively existing beings with their own persons, goals, and motivations.

Spirits are not "supernatural" in the sense of being beyond or outside of Nature; they exist within the same enormous natural ecology that human beings do, though they inhabit regions of it that are unseen. The regions of our great ecology that spirits inhabit are intimately connected to the regions we experience every day. What sorcerers can do is consciously access these subtle regions and extend the reality of relationship to them. To make relationships with spirits, to create friendships or other arrangements with them so that they will bring the mysterious abilities and capacities they have to bear upon your wants and needs, and to make this relationship mutually beneficial: this is the basic theory of sorcery.

This is what makes a spirit a familiar spirit- a spirit with which a man or woman has some form of pact, relationship, or agreement. Sorcerers may have more than one familiar; many extraordinary relationships of this kind can be created and maintained, and will lead to many abilities or capacities on the part of the sorcerer.

In ancient Greece, primal sorcerous arts were categorized under the heading of Goetia- a word that means "charming" or "sorcery. Pre-modern Witchcraft from Europe was likewise a part of this same deeper cultural reality: witches were made into witches by powerful entities from the Unseen World.

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They gained connections with and awareness of the Unseen through various means, some chosen and others unchosen, such as traumatic experiences or near-death encounters. And they performed witchcraft with the aid of familiar spirits.

Pre-modern witchcraft, the witchcraft of the Early Modern period, was not a unified religious cult. It was a decentralized, non-unified, organic, spontaneous, and cross-cultural experience had by certain men and women from many places, of ecstatic visionary contact and communication with the Unseen world, and the formation of relationships with spirits.

Witches who had such relationships could divine, heal, curse, and perform the many extraordinary feats attributed to them by folklore from the pre-modern period, and from even earlier accounts.

Modern Witchcraft- or Wicca- though it is a popular and meaningful pursuit and religious belief system for many modern people, is a distinctive phenomenon from pre-Modern witchcraft. There is little or no historical continuity between pre-modern and modern witchcraft.

Modern witchcraft primarily involves itself with the practice of magic, which we will discuss in a moment. The term "Witchcraft" in its pre-modern meaning, and the term "sorcery", are synonyms. Witchcraft and sorcery are two names for the same phenomenon. The Covenant embraces both terms for describing what it does at the practical level. Historical Sorcery like all pre-modern Witchcraft was relational. It was not manifested by an individual man and woman who had within themselves a personal power to perform divinations, heal people, hex people, or anything of that nature.

It was manifested through the relationship of a man or woman with a spirit or spirits. The idea that a man or woman may have, within their own individual person, a power to create changes in the world or perform preternatural feats, is not the basis of sorcery. It is the basis of Magic- what the ancient Greeks would have classified as Mageia.

The sorcerer and the mage, or the witch and the mage, are historically distinctive figures, who come from two extremely different metaphysical and social backgrounds. Magic- in ancient times as well as now- can rightly be called the art of utilizing personal will to influence changes in the world. Magical practices, then as now, tend to orient themselves around the development of will, and disciplines for projecting personal power and will towards goals.

Very often this takes the form of some kind of "magical energy" that is believed to exist and to be directed by will or special magical tools. Mages have turned their wills towards the goal of summoning and compelling of spirits to obey them, for thousands of years. To the extent that any mage ever succeeded in this endeavor, that mage would have performed not only an act of magic but of sorcery too- even though mages throughout Christian history looked down upon sorcery as a lesser art, and as potentially dangerous or evil.

Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa, the Rennaisance mage, said "Now the parts of ceremonial magic are goetia and theurgia. Goetia is unfortunate, by the commerces of unclean spirits made up of the rites of wicked curiosities, unlawful charms, and deprecations, and is abandoned and execrated by all laws.

Sorcerous practices are born from the time before civilization; it was always by its nature a "rustic" art, an art of common people, an art of oral cultures, of the people who lived outside of cities and far from "high" civilization.

Magic, on the other hand, was born within the halls of philosophers, academies, temples, and within the literate sphere of educated social elites. There is a primordial form of classism that divides the witch in the countryside from the mage in his manor-house or his library, but also a struggle between civilized authority and pre-civilized spiritual ecology which seems wild, mysterious, or frightening to social authorities and ordinary people.

These understood distinctions and animosities between Sorcery and Magic have largely been lost in the passage of time; most people today think that sorcery is just another word for magic. The Covenant strongly holds to the distinction between these two things.

Magic is generally speaking an ego-centered and personal will-centered pursuit; sorcery is never about a singular individual or their personal will, but about how that individual relates to spirit-allies and perhaps even to other sorcerous human allies.

What the ordinary human will cannot manage alone, spirit-allies can make possible. The Covenant does not teach or perform magic. The Covenant empowers modern sorcerers- or people who want to be sorcerers- in their practice of sorcery, in their creation and maintenance of relationships with spirit-entities. Trance states are induced, and special dreams are incubated, to allow the Covenant's sorcerers to interact with spirits and form pacts and relationships with them.

Now, as in the pre-modern period, trance states and special sorts of dreams are the primary vehicles of Witchcraft or sorcery. The Covenant also utilizes special sounds and words to attract the attentions of spirits, and a special symbolic language to help bring the minds of practitioners closer to the Unseen world. Relationalism, the chief concept which the Covenant relies upon for its central metaphysical focus, is not merely an alternative means by which a man or woman might find their way to extraordinary experiences.

Relationalism is life. All things are relational. No "will" or "ego" exists apart from others, nor apart from relationship with others. The Covenant does not embrace the idea that humans are full of infinite or enormous cosmic potential, waiting to be developed. This is a form of modern arrogance, a form of anthropocentrism which the Covenant sternly rejects.

The limits of human beings are many and they are completely natural, for natural boundaries are formed by Nature around all beings. What allows the human being to move beyond certain boundaries and always hopefully wisely is the creation of relationships with entities, allies, and teachers who can facilitate such a thing. Humans cannot otherwise do this alone. Learning our natural and healthy limits, as well as the ways we might still have extraordinary developments, explorations, or attainments through relationships with powerful or wise spirits, is the essence of the sorcerous art.

Cooperating with and learning from the many forms of sentient life both ordinary and extraordinary forms of life who indwell our natural world- who share with us our only home, which gave birth to us all- is the primal core of sorcery.

There is a natural reverence here: a re- discovery of our place in things, along with all the true relational wisdom it might still inspire in us, just as it inspired our Ancestors. The Tale of Jowanet Innes In the story "Jowanet and the Fayerie Man", an entire portrait of the Covenant's aesthetic, worldview, ideas about sorcery, and many other things were communicated. A historical fiction piece was chosen to express this, because stories have a way of communicating and imparting important information that no other form of explanation can.

Jowanet Innes is a fictional character, but the places, events, cultural realities and certain other characters described in her story were and are real. She is an image of a pre-modern witch, a pre- modern sorceress, who obtained her connection to the Unseen through traumatic experience- through nearly dying as a child. Not all people who undergo traumatic experiences or near-death encounters will become witches or sorcerers, but some may.

Afterward, Jowanet was contacted by a fayerie man- "fayerie" here being a folkloric term for an otherworldly being. In Jowanet's time, the dead of this world were often seen as becoming fayeries, and the historical connection between the dead and fayerie-entities is described in detail in Robin Artisson's book An Carow Gwyn: Sorcery and the Ancient Fayerie Faith. Through Jowanet's relationship with her fayerie-man, she was able to do sorcery.

In their relationship, the Seen and Unseen were brought together, and preternatural feats- like healing- were made possible. Jowanet may be fictional, but Bessie Dunlop was not. Bessie was a woman executed for witchcraft in She gained her power to heal from a fayerie-man, too: his name was Thomas Reid, and he was a man who had been killed in the Battle of Pinkie some 30 years before he appeared to Bessie. Thomas told Bessie that he was now of the fayerie people, and a friend to the Queen of Elfhame, or the Queen of Fayeries.

He also urged Bessie to abandon any faith in Christianity- a startling but not surprising indictment of the spiritual toxicity of Abrahamic ideology in the eyes of the spirit world. Willeam Colison, Jowanet's fayerie-familiar, is based on Thomas Reid and the historical account and case of Bessie Dunlop. This aspect of Jowanet's story, as with many other aspects of it, hearkens directly back to the solid ground of pre-modern Witch folklore and metaphysics.

This is one of countless examples, found in history, of relational sorcery being done by men and women with the help of familiars. Jowanet found her way to extraordinary connections and states through near-death trauma, but there are many ways a man or woman might obtain these capacities and conditions for themselves, without having to go through such extreme trauma. Many are the pathways to sorcery, but this is not to say that sorcery is an art that will be suitable- or even possible- for everyone.

Our modern world has made it hard to acquire and replicate the subtle mind-states that are needed to have spectral intercourse with the Unseen world in a more-or-less predictable way. The Unseen is itself unpredictable and strange. We are scourged- deep throughout our social conditioning- by Western rationalism, absolutist and simplistic and false conclusions born from arrogant scientism, and terrified of the Unseen by Christian cultural memes that have been repeated for years, presenting the Unseen as a world of demonic dangers and damnation.

Even if we reject the lunacy of scientism, we still live in a culture that honors "science" as the highest standard for truth, and which relegates all other ways of knowing to the level of superstition or ignorance. Even if we reject Abrahamic religions in any of their forms, most of us still come from Christian cultures, which communicate the worldview of Christianity and Abrahamic monotheism to all of us at a deep unconscious level.

This is true also for people who were raised as 'atheists' or without any religion. Cultural Christianity is buried in the heart of our culture. It shapes our moral and social considerations from an unconscious level, and our appraisal of any spiritual beliefs and practices we encounter or learn about.

This background we all live in- a social background of one-sided rationalism that rejects sorcery and witchcraft as a ridiculous superstition, or as a demonic evil- greatly hinders most people again, at a deeply unconscious level from being able to really be open and interactive with the Unseen world as it really exists.

Jowanet lived in a time when these social forces were very different, and even though she lived in a Christian culture, Emma Wilby the authoress of the groundbreaking works Cunning Folk and Familiar Spirits and The Visions of Isobel Gowdie demonstrates how the pre-modern "Christian" mind was, in belief, cosmology, and understanding, extremely different from our modern minds.

There was room within the amazing pre-modern matrix of belief, for many strange combinations of cosmological conception, and openness to genuine spiritual encounters that we cannot begin to imagine.

Even as The Covenant recognizes these hard realities, it also rejoices in its triumphs: The Covenant has a very deep and rich system of obtaining extraordinary conditions of mind, which can enable people to potentially actualize pre-modern Sorcerous encounters and enlarge upon them in continuing encounter and relationship here in the modern day. The Covenant's metaphysical workings, understandings, rituals, practices, insights, and deep ecological awareness is growing every day.

And it is all turned to the service of obtaining for men and women in the modern day what Jowanet Innes had organically and spontaneously. Those who read the story of Jowanet are being invited to feel a certain intense aesthetic of organic, place-centered, spirit-driven, ecstatic-state manifested sorcery. This is witchcraft in the true old sense of the word- what some refer to as "Traditional Witchcraft. They interacted with beings from times long past, and had visions which, if we understand them in the wide context of sociology, mythology, and history, reveal the interior workings of the Unseen world.

They could heal; they could seek justice and vengeance for people who had no other way of striking out at their oppressors or tormentors; they could manipulate many organic realities of life, and they did so, sometimes in helpful, and other times in harmful or unwise ways. They were human beings. Their capacity for ecstatic vision and spirit-connection didn't automatically make them wise, benevolent, harmless beings.

The Unseen is ambiguous. Spirits are ambiguous. Clear-cut ideas like "good and evil" do not figure in any of this. Ideals like "perfection" do not figure; such things belong to an alien and unwise way of seeing the world, compared to the primordial spiritual-ecological grace manifested by the witch-folk of older times. This primordial grace didn't come with only healing and happiness in its wings; it came with harm and sorrow, too, because that is the hard truth about reality- human reality or other-than-human.

Jowanet's relationships with Willeam, or with the Fayerie Queen, or with any of the spirits she encountered, were not simple things.

For Willeam, she felt friendship. For the Fayerie Queen, she probably felt a great measure of reverence and awe. There may have been a sense of friendship there, too. For other spirits, she may have felt happiness at interacting with them, or perhaps just a sense of natural wonder.

There may have been fear at times. This is the reality of relating to spirits. The Covenant is an organization that knows how to show proper reverence to powerful spirits, but it is not a religious organization. It does not have "priests" or "priestesses". Jowanet, and the pre-modern witches and sorcerers who lived and died in our world, were not priests and priestesses of Nature, or of Pagan Gods or Goddesses.

They were not descendents of druids. They were humans capable of special kinds of ecstatic communications with the spirit world, who had relationships with spirits. Some of those relationships could have come close to what we might call "religious" these days- they may have had great reverence and awe for certain powerful beings that they met in visionary states.

But this is an organic kind of relationship, born in an experiential matrix of encounter, a very flexible and personal kind of interaction, not a well- defined, organized, and institutionalized kind as we see in most religious organizations. What Jowanet encountered, the way she was made capable of doing extraordinary things by spirits, is what the Covenant wants for its members. The simplicity and beauty of her life, the fact that she was in many ways a very ordinary woman who worked with her hands, the way she knew and loved places, friends, and family, the way she helped people out of a spontaneous sense of humanity and kinship, the way her curiosity was satisfied and guided by spirits- this is what The Covenant finds both realistic and desirable.

Jowanet was protected in life, and guided away in death, by a being she had a deeper kind of relationship with: a being the Covenant calls a fetch follower, and who appeared to Jowanet in dreams and visions as a sandy-haired boy, and later as a man.

This aspect of her story the relationship of human being to guardian or tutelary spirit is a statement of a common and constant spiritual-ecological theme that emerges from folklore, and from the recorded beliefs of even earlier people, all over the world. The creating of a conscious relationship with this entity- and many others- ranks among the goals the Covenant has for its membership.

Through these relationships, if we are fortunate enough to be able to create them and maintain them, we know that human beings can have better lives, see a deeper vision for life, and have more help in obtaining what we want and need for ourselves and our loved ones. In the same way that there are many paths to obtaining trance-states, ecstatic visionary encounter with the Unseen world, and relationships with spirits, many are the spirit-beings a man or woman may encounter and make relationships with.

Jowanet's story shows only one example: her familiar was a formerly dead human man, and she had further a further relationship of benevolence with the Queen of the Underworldly fayerie- beings.

The Queen was obviously not a "familiar" to Jowanet, as much as a great Otherworldly power that bestowed a familiar upon her in the form of Willeam. But these two entities represent in our example story Jowanet's spiritual teachers and empowerers.

Countless other stories could be told showing other spirit-beings as teachers and empowerers; countless others appear in the annals of history and folklore. The Covenant knows a powerful spirit-entity in whose name it assembles and which all members enter into a relationship with upon entering the Covenant, but beyond that, in the sorcerous life of any member, there is no end to the variety of spirit-persons they may relate to, or what they may learn from them.

What folklore and folk tradition has taught the Covenant about spirit-interaction provides a further groundwork for all members: to comprehend the hidden points and places of overlap between our world and the Unseen regions of experience, such as old wells, caves, openings in the earth, root-holes, the liminal places where land and water meet, springs, burial grounds, special growths or formations of certain plants, trees, or fungus, ancient earthworks, special landforms otherwise- and to utilize special techniques to interact with them- this is one example of an important dimension of sorcerous effort.

It is not an open, public organization, and it protects the privacy of its membership very carefully. The Covenant assembles itself in a conceptual framework called The Common Ground. Some of the Covenant's members belong to affinity groups within the Covenant, created within the shared space of its Common Ground, called septs, which handle various tasks related to the Covenant's operation. One sept is devoted to helping potential members through the process of formation, by which people become full members; another is devoted to organizing and hosting the Covenant's events such as the yearly Sabbat meeting and ensuring that the Covenant's in-person events and virtual places of meeting are held to the highest standards of interaction and fellowship.

Other septs are created and organized by members to support their work together on special interest projects, or to further their study and practice of particular sorcerous arts that they have a shared interest in. The Covenant is an initiatory organization; members must travel to undergo an initiation, which the Covenant calls an induction, always held in a remote location.

Other special events for members may be held, though no member is compelled to attend events. All members are given access to the Covenant's special resources relating to modern sorcerous practice, and are encouraged to help develop them in co-workings with others. The Covenant is not a "coven.

It is a body of peers. It is called a covenant because of the agreements all of its members enter into together alongside the common experiences that come to bind them and it is always seeking future members who might make good allies in the pursuit of the Covenant's goals. The Covenant is not a religious community. It does not view sorcery or witchcraft as religious practices. It does think of them as crafts, as arts, and as things that can lead a man or woman to have powerful relationships with spirits.

While many people may rightly consider this to be innately spiritual on some level, and while it may satisfy spiritual yearnings in some people, it is still not religious by any ordinary measure. The Covenant is not a replacement for anyone's Neopagan spiritual community or former church.

The Covenant's Sabbat meetings are celebratory events, and very deep bonds and friendships can be made between human members. But this is not the primary purpose of the Covenant.

It's just a very fortunate and desirable side-effect of working together. The Covenant is not for everyone. People who are religiously or ideologically devoted to, believers in, or actively involved with any form of Abrahamic monotheism cannot be Covenanters. The worldview of Abrahamic monotheism, as expressed by Christian, Muslim, and Jewish traditions, is intrinsically at odds with the worldview of spiritual ecology as the Covenant understands it. This spiritual-ecological worldview- which is refuted and rejected in various ways by past and present-day monotheists- completely informs how the Covenant thinks about the reality of spirits, how humans can and should interact with them, and many other important issues.

The Covenant is not about magic. It's about sorcery, and the Covenant's definition of sorcery as well as the clear distinctions laid out in this document between magic and sorcery is key to the Covenant's identity, its activities, and its mission. People who believe that magic and sorcery are two names for the same thing would not be suitable for Covenant membership. Folk magic which has a clear spiritual-ecological basis and an organic origin within traditional culture is viewed as an acceptable method of interacting with the Unseen world within the context of the Covenant, so long as it is not expressed with heavily Christian or Abrahamic aesthetics.

The Covenant is not seeking to be resolved with other esoteric organizations and metaphysical systems. The Covenant's methodology of sorcery, and the esoteric worldview that underlies it, is unique to the Covenant. Its methods and esoteric framework both stem from clear historical realities and sources, but the Covenant's main ideas and its main practical works do not "fit into" the other magical or sorcerous paradigms that are popular or well-known today.

The Covenant has no need or desire to compare its core concepts and practices to those of other esoteric groups or traditions, seeking some sort of parallelism or metaphysical agreement between them.

The Covenant is not merely a re-statement or re-arrangement of concepts and practices that can be easily found in any number of other groups. If this were the case, the Covenant would have little reason to exist. The Covenant is not universalist.

It does not hold that magic or sorcery is in any way religious; it does not hold that all religions are "true" somehow, or able to be resolved with one another; it does not possess any belief in a singular divine being that created everything and which communicates somehow to all humans and cultures according to their needs.

The Covenant does not automatically revere spiritual or religious traditions merely because they are centuries or thousands of years old, or because they are genuinely believed in by millions or billions of people. The Covenant does not float its members in delusions of new-age universalism. It doesn't engage in the endless and fruitless theological debates that have wasted the last years of Western history. The Covenant empowers its members in the practice of sorcery. It studies patterns in pre-modern sorcery, and folklore and myth that clearly relates to patterns of pre-modern sorcery.

Jowanet hoped in the future. Jowanet was afraid to use the powder at first. But the breathing woman you are must be blown on the wind. Jowanet's special attention was paid to children who had fallen under the bane of sickness.

Three days after Jowanet administered the fayerie powder. It was not just a panacea for the ills of human beings. Next it was the young daughter of Eby Catlow. Some said in hushed tones that fayeries helped Jowanet to heal.

Ellin married Ranald Leith. Willeam took Jowanet to see the Fayerie Queen. The Earl of Moray has written a summons for you. The news he bore for her was grim. Jowanet was secretly consumed by another world. While the people of the villages went about their lives.

Scattered among them she saw the shapes of entities that were part human and part beast. Jowanet wondered if she were to die then. Down they went together. Her children and family were here. He told her tales of forgotten times that he had learned in fayerie-land. From below the stones of the Old King's Cairn.

It need not be so. Here she was known. Willeam came to her side. Men of property have accused you. Jowanet's children grew into strong and capable adults. This very night you can take your leave.

Jowanet had never seen such a company of majestic beings. But to go where? This was the only home Jowanet had known for fifty years. Others will be compelled to speak against you. The Queen greeted her with great mirth and generosity. One dark night.

Summers faded into winters. Not wanting to be seen. Alone in her cottage one cold night. The Auldearn minister will testify to this. Willeam said. Sworn to secrecy.

After another few years had passed. Willeam urged. Willeam showed her wonders she could not have dreamed of. The infant son of Mary Dunbar was dying. Jowanet told him she could help. From there. She crossed the Findhorn River and came at length to the village of Ferness. Willeam vowed to her that it would be so. Jowanet lost track of the time she spent wandering.

She never told of her origins or life in the lands to the north. It carried Jowanet Innes. Great joy descended on the house after that time as Mathew's son fast recovered. Hunger began to shrink her limbs. Mathew Caugiltoun would tolerate none of their gossip. Many of those she knew from before were dead or. Jowanet would not see her grandchildren born. She left the bag of gold coin given her by the Dunbars where her son would find it.

Jowanet traveled south for days. Willeam went before her. These were the wide and brooding lands that lived under the sword of the Wolf of Badenoch. Jowanet told Willeam that her only wish was to die in Whitemire. And there Jowanet remained. She would not see them grow through the years. For such a remote farm.

His words struck as hard as steel. Early one morning. Mathew's family knew her as Agnes. This was the farmstead of Mathew Caugiltoun. There was a wide copse of dark trees nearby. Her family gathered around her in great sadness. They embraced and lay on the warm hillsides. A few of the folk who recognized her still lifted their hats.

Her husband had also died many seasons before her return. Jowanet's companion finally took her hand and led her to the far end of the meadow. But Jowanet didn't see their tears as they circled her bed. There waiting for her was the sandy-haired man. Then she entered the wide green meadow that waited on the other side. He welcomed his mother with a fierce joy. The darkness and the light passed over them. The mud of the roads was gone and the sheep were quiet. She walked down the road until the path began to curve.

A little over a year later. Jowanet did not wake from her sleep.

As 1100 Technical Drawing Standards

The Earl of Moray had died some years before. Its goal is to bring the reality of historical sorcery back to life in the modern world. The Covenant's methods and aesthetics both rise from historical documents and folklore. It was a decentralized. To make relationships with spirits. What sorcerers can do is consciously access these subtle regions and extend the reality of relationship to them.

The regions of our great ecology that spirits inhabit are intimately connected to the regions we experience every day. In ancient Greece. Spirits are not "supernatural" in the sense of being beyond or outside of Nature. Pre-modern Witchcraft from Europe was likewise a part of this same deeper cultural reality: Witches who had such. They gained connections with and awareness of the Unseen through various means.

Spirits are living beings that exist in an extraordinary way compared to the ordinary encounters one may have with other beings on a day to day basis. Spirits are not aspects of the human psyche.

Sorcerers may have more than one familiar. Pre-modern witchcraft. This is what makes a spirit a familiar spirit. And they performed witchcraft with the aid of familiar spirits. Sorcery refers to the art. The sorcerer and the mage. It was not manifested by an individual man and woman who had within themselves a personal power to perform divinations. To the extent that any mage ever succeeded in this endeavor. Mages have turned their wills towards the goal of summoning and compelling of spirits to obey them.

Via Savyok Pactum

Modern witchcraft primarily involves itself with the practice of magic. The idea that a man or woman may have. It was manifested through the relationship of a man or woman with a spirit or spirits. There is little or no historical continuity between pre-modern and modern witchcraft. Modern Witchcraft. The term "Witchcraft" in its pre-modern meaning. Historical Sorcery like all pre-modern Witchcraft was relational. Goetia is unfortunate.

The Covenant embraces both terms for describing what it does at the practical level. It is the basis of Magic. Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa. Witchcraft and sorcery are two names for the same phenomenon. Magical practices. Very often this takes the form of some kind of "magical energy" that is believed to exist and to be directed by will or special magical tools.

The Covenant empowers modern sorcerers. The limits of human beings are many and they are completely natural. All things are relational. No "will" or "ego" exists apart from others.

Goetia was seen as dark. Relationalism is life. The Covenant also utilizes special sounds and words to attract the attentions of spirits.

This is a form of modern arrogance. The Covenant does not embrace the idea that humans are full of infinite or enormous cosmic potential. The Covenant does not teach or perform magic. There is a primordial form of classism that divides the witch in the countryside from the mage in his manor-house or his library. Trance states are induced. Magic is generally speaking an ego-centered and personal will-centered pursuit. What the ordinary human will cannot manage alone.

Sorcerous practices are born from the time before civilization. These understood distinctions and animosities between Sorcery and Magic have largely been lost in the passage of time. The Covenant strongly holds to the distinction between these two things. Thomas told Bessie that he was now of the fayerie people. In Jowanet's time.

A historical fiction piece was chosen to express this. Through Jowanet's relationship with her fayerie-man. Sorcery and the Ancient Fayerie Faith. In their relationship. She gained her power to heal from a fayerie-man. What allows the human being to move beyond certain boundaries and always hopefully wisely is the creation of relationships with entities. Jowanet may be fictional. Bessie was a woman executed for witchcraft in Jowanet was contacted by a fayerie man.

He also urged Bessie to abandon any faith in Christianity. Humans cannot otherwise do this alone. Learning our natural and healthy limits. She is an image of a pre-modern witch. Cooperating with and learning from the many forms of sentient life both ordinary and extraordinary forms of life who indwell our natural world.

There is a natural reverence here: Jowanet Innes is a fictional character. Not all people who undergo traumatic experiences or near-death encounters will become witches or sorcerers. Jowanet lived in a time when these social forces were very different. This is one of countless examples. Many are the pathways to sorcery. Cultural Christianity is buried in the heart of our culture.

This background we all live in. Jowanet's fayerie-familiar. We are scourged. Emma Wilby the authoress of the groundbreaking works Cunning Folk and. Our modern world has made it hard to acquire and replicate the subtle mind-states that are needed to have spectral intercourse with the Unseen world in a more-or-less predictable way. It shapes our moral and social considerations from an unconscious level.

Willeam Colison. The Unseen is itself unpredictable and strange. Even if we reject Abrahamic religions in any of their forms. This is true also for people who were raised as 'atheists' or without any religion. Jowanet found her way to extraordinary connections and states through near-death trauma. This aspect of Jowanet's story. Even if we reject the lunacy of scientism. There was room within the amazing pre-modern matrix of belief.

They interacted with beings from times long past. They were human beings. Their capacity for ecstatic vision and spirit-connection didn't automatically make them wise. The Covenant's metaphysical workings. Ideals like "perfection" do not figure. There may have been a sense of friendship. The Covenant has a very deep and rich system of obtaining extraordinary conditions of mind. For the Fayerie Queen. This primordial grace didn't come with only healing and happiness in its wings.

Clear-cut ideas like "good and evil" do not figure in any of this. Even as The Covenant recognizes these hard realities. Those who read the story of Jowanet are being invited to feel a certain intense aesthetic of organic.

This is witchcraft in the true old sense of the word. Jowanet's relationships with Willeam. The Unseen is ambiguous. For Willeam. Spirits are ambiguous. They could heal. And it is all turned to the service of obtaining for men and women in the modern day what Jowanet Innes had organically and spontaneously. What Jowanet encountered. The creating of a conscious relationship with this entity. They were not descendents of druids.

This is the reality of relating to spirits. This aspect of her story the relationship of human being to guardian or tutelary spirit is a statement of a common and constant spiritual-ecological theme that emerges from folklore. In the same way that there are many paths to obtaining trance-states. It does not have "priests" or "priestesses". They were humans capable of special kinds of ecstatic communications with the spirit world. Some of those relationships could have come close to what we might call "religious" these days.

But this is an organic kind of relationship. Jowanet was protected in life. There may have been fear at times. The simplicity and beauty of her life. Through these relationships. For other spirits. The Covenant is an organization that knows how to show proper reverence to powerful spirits.

What folklore and folk tradition has taught the Covenant about spirit-interaction provides a further groundwork for all members: Some of the Covenant's members belong to affinity groups within the Covenant. It is not an open.

The Covenant knows a powerful spirit-entity in whose name it assembles and which all members enter into a relationship with upon entering the Covenant. But these two entities represent in our example story Jowanet's spiritual teachers and empowerers. Jowanet's story shows only one example: Countless other stories could be told showing other spirit-beings as teachers and empowerers.

One sept is devoted to helping potential members through the process of formation. The Queen was obviously not a "familiar" to Jowanet. Other septs are created and organized by members to support their work together on special interest projects. The Covenant assembles itself in a conceptual framework called The Common Ground. All members are given access to the Covenant's special resources relating to modern sorcerous practice. People who are religiously or ideologically devoted to. The Covenant is not a "coven.

The Covenant is not a replacement for anyone's Neopagan spiritual community or former church. The worldview of Abrahamic monotheism. The Covenant is an initiatory organization. Other special events for members may be held.

It does not view sorcery or witchcraft as religious practices. It is a body of peers. It's just a very fortunate and desirable side-effect of working together. The Covenant's Sabbat meetings are celebratory events.

The Covenant is also not for people who don't have a very deep. This spiritual-ecological worldview. But this is not the primary purpose of the Covenant. The Covenant is not a religious community. It does think of them as crafts. While many people may rightly consider this to be innately spiritual on some level. The Covenant is not for everyone. It is called a covenant because of the agreements all of its members enter into together alongside the common experiences that come to bind them and it is always seeking future members who might make good allies in the pursuit of the Covenant's goals.

If this were the case. Its methods and esoteric framework both stem from clear historical realities and sources. The Covenant's methodology of sorcery. People who believe the contrary of these things. The Covenant does not float its members in delusions of new-age universalism. People who believe that magic and sorcery are two names for the same thing would not be suitable for Covenant membership. It does not hold that magic or sorcery is in any way religious. The Covenant is not merely a re-statement or re-arrangement of concepts and practices that can be easily found in any number of other groups.

The Covenant does not automatically revere spiritual or religious traditions merely because they are centuries or thousands of years old. It's about sorcery. It studies patterns in. It doesn't engage in the endless and fruitless theological debates that have wasted the last years of Western history.Mouhamadou Mansour. They came in the cold of February, plundering for food, raping women, and killing men who resisted them. Jowanet asked Willeam why he had appeared to her now.

It is not an open. It was a strange tale he told; twenty years before, on the road to Glenshiel, a detachment of Montrose's horsemen bore down upon him and the men he was marching with. Pre-modern Witchcraft from Europe was likewise a part of this same deeper cultural reality: witches were made into witches by powerful entities from the Unseen World. It was not manifested by an individual man and woman who had within themselves a personal power to perform divinations.

Jowanet Innes is a fictional character, but the places, events, cultural realities and certain other characters described in her story were and are real.

OSVALDO from Sioux Falls
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